Access Windows Share from Raspberry Pi (revisited)

Last year I described a simple method of automounting a directory from my windows server to my Raspberry Pi. Since then I’ve gone down a couple of paths to simplify rebuilding my Raspberry Pi machines.

The method I used last year required modifying the /etc/hosts file, the /etc/fstab file, pre-creating the mount points, and creating a credentials file to store the windows login credentials.

My new method doesn’t require modification of the /etc/hosts or /etc/fstab files, or pre-creating the mount points. Instead I’m relying on two features, Multicast DNS and systemd.automount unit files.

In the old method, to find the windows server, I added it to the local hosts file on the raspberry pi.

192.168.0.12 Acid

Using Multicast DNS, if I simply recognize that I can reach the server with the name Acid.WimsWorld.local the raspberry pi will find the server on the local network. My first step was to modify my /etc/fstab enty to use the local address and clean up my hosts file.

//acid.wimsworld.local/web /media/acid/web/ cifs credentials=/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials,noauto,x-systemd.automount,x-systemd.idle-timeout=2min,_netdev 0 0

I’d never been happy with modifying the /etc/fstab file as part of my system configuration because in newer installations it is unique to each machine, specifying the boot partitions by their formatted serial number:

proc            /proc           proc    defaults          0       0
PARTUUID=142ff4e3-01  /boot           vfat    defaults          0       2
PARTUUID=142ff4e3-02  /               ext4    defaults,noatime  0       1
# a swapfile is not a swap partition, no line here
#   use  dphys-swapfile swap[on|off]  for that

In my recent programming projects I’ve been working with systemd unit files to control my service processes and have come to understand how they work for automounting directories as well. I like that each directory has its own unit files meaning that a modification is less likely to cause problems for the system as a whole.

The single line from the /etc/fstab file above is removed and replaced by two unit files, /etc/systemd/system/media-acid-web.mount and /etc/systemd/system/media-acid-web.automount.

[Unit]
Description=Acid Web

[Mount]
What=//acid.wimsworld.local/web
Where=/media/acid/web
Type=cifs
Options=credentials=/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials,vers=2.1

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

and

[Unit]
Description=Automount Acid Web

[Automount]
Where=/media/acid/web
TimeoutIdleSec=120

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

I still had to create the credentials file for this to work, since I wanted the credentials file to be only root readable in a different location. /etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials

username=WindowsUsername
password=WindowsPassword
domain=OptionalDomainName

After the three files are created, systemd needs to reload its database with the systemctl daemon-reload command, the automount needs to be enabled with the systemctl enable media-acid-web.automount command, and then started with the systemctl start media-acid-web.automount command.

The naming of the mount files is important, and described explicitly in the man pages for each of mount and automount. In my case, /media/acid/web gets named media-acid-web.mount and media-acid-web.automount. I didn’t need to create mount points in the /media directory, as systemd automatically takes care of that.

I was able to create all of the above with a simple paste into my terminal with the following string:

sudo bash
cat > /etc/systemd/system/media-acid-web.mount <<EOF
[Unit]
Description=Acid Web

[Mount]
What=//acid.wimsworld.local/web
Where=/media/acid/web
Type=cifs
Options=credentials=/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials,vers=2.1

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target
EOF
cat > /etc/systemd/system/media-acid-web.automount <<EOF
[Unit]
Description=Automount Acid Web

[Automount]
Where=/media/acid/web
TimeoutIdleSec=120

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target
EOF
cat > /etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials <<EOF
username=WindowsUsername
password=WindowsPassword
domain=OptionalDomainName
EOF
chmod 0600 /etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials
systemctl daemon-reload
systemctl enable media-acid-web.automount
systemctl start media-acid-web.automount
exit

With the standard Raspberry Pi setup, the cat command is not available as a sudo command while the bash shell is. I’m taking advantage of that by running the bash shell as root and then all of the other commands with root privileges.

GoveeBTTempLogger as a Debian Package

After getting my program to listen and log Bluetooth Low Energy advertisements from Govee thermometers running reliably, I needed to figure out how to make the program automatically start when my Raspberry was rebooted. I was led down two paths to get things working, systemd unit files, and debian package files created with dpkg-deb.

The final file structure I came up with is visible in https://github.com/wcbonner/GoveeBTTempLogger but still can use some explanation as to what I did.

To create the debian package, I created a file structure under my source repository that mimicked what I wanted to put on the target system.

\GOVEEBTTEMPLOGGER\GOVEEBTTEMPLOGGER
├───DEBIAN
│       control
│       postinst
│       postrm
│       prerm
│
├───etc
│   └───systemd
│       └───system
│               goveebttemplogger.service
│
├───usr
│   └───local
│       └───bin
│               goveebttemplogger
│
└───var
    └───log
        └───goveebttemplogger
                gvh507x.txt

I had decided I wanted my executable to be located in /usr/local/bin. It’s the file named goveebttemplogger. I wanted it to write log files into /var/log/goveebttemplogger/ and the easiest way to make sure that directory was created was to put a zero length file in that directory, gvh507x.txt.

The files in the DEBIAN directory are used by the dpkg-deb program when building the distributable package. More on those later.

To get the program configured to automatically run when the machine boots, and properly stop when it shuts down, I settled on the systemd unit files as the both the easiest and most reliable method. I’ve been around linux long enough to first think of /etc/rc.local manipulation, then script files for various runlevels in the /etc/init.d/ directories, and was amazed at both the power and ease of setting up to use the systemd unit files. The hardest part was figuring out what other services my program must have already started. I knew it was dependent on Bluetooth, but the specific services was a bit of a guess.

# Contents of /etc/systemd/system/goveebttemplogger.service
[Unit]
Description=GoveeBTTempLogger service
After=bluetooth.target dbus-org.bluez.service network.target
Requires=bluetooth.target
KillSignal=SIGINT

[Service]
Type=simple
Restart=always
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/goveebttemplogger -v 0 -l /var/log/goveebttemplogger/

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

After creating that file in the specified location, I was able to issue the following commands to make systemd start the program.

sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl enable goveebttemplogger.service
sudo systemctl start goveebttemplogger.service

The most unique bit of my unit file is that I specifically want my program to be sent the SIGINT signal to kill it, since I will recognize that and flush the log files before exiting. The ExecStart line is the command line to run my program, which I’m also specifying the log directory as one of the parameters.

I had the systemd unit file and the initial DEBIAN/control file figured out pretty easily. I’d come across this https://linuxconfig.org/easy-way-to-create-a-debian-package-and-local-package-repository article which helped understanding the control file.

Package: GoveeBTTempLogger
Version: 1.20200725-1
Section: custom
Priority: optional
Architecture: armhf
Essential: no
Installed-Size: 95
Maintainer: wcbonner@users.noreply.github.com
Description: Listen and log Govee Thermometer Bluetooth Low Energy Advertisments
Depends: libbluetooth3

What took me a while to figure out was how to get the systemctl commands to be run after the files were put in place by the package manager. There are four script commands, which I’m using three. preinst, postinst, prerm, and postrm. Each of them is a simple script and needs to be marked executable in the file system. They are each run at various stages by the package manager, Pre-Installation, Post-Installation, Pre-Removal, and Post-Removal.

#!/bin/sh
# POSTINST script for goveebttemplogger

echo "\033[36m HI I'M A POSTINST SCRIPT `date +"%s"` \033[39m"
systemctl daemon-reload
systemctl enable goveebttemplogger.service
systemctl start goveebttemplogger.service

exit 0

After installation of my program and the systemd unit file, I reload the systemd database, enable my service, and start my service.

#!/bin/sh
# PRERM script for goveebttemplogger

echo "\033[36m HI I'M A PRERM SCRIPT `date +"%s"` \033[39m"
systemctl stop goveebttemplogger.service
systemctl disable goveebttemplogger.service

exit 0

Before removal of my program, I stop the service and disable the service.

#!/bin/sh
# POSTRM script for goveebttemplogger

echo "\033[36m HI I'M A POSTRM SCRIPT `date +"%s"` \033[39m"
systemctl daemon-reload

exit 0

After removal of my program, I reload the systemd database, to make sure it’s not got my unit file in its database any longer.

When I retrieve a copy of my code with the command git clone https://github.com/wcbonner/GoveeBTTempLogger I then have a subdirectory below the GoveeBTTempLogger that is also named GoveeBTTempLogger. That deeper directory is the structure that will be created into the package.


GoveeBTTempLogger/usr/local/bin/goveebttemplogger: goveebttemplogger.cpp
        mkdir -p GoveeBTTempLogger/usr/local/bin
        g++ -lbluetooth goveebttemplogger.cpp -o GoveeBTTempLogger/usr/local/bin/goveebttemplogger

deb: GoveeBTTempLogger/usr/local/bin/goveebttemplogger GoveeBTTempLogger/DEBIAN/control GoveeBTTempLogger/etc/systemd/system/goveebttemplogger.service
        mkdir -p GoveeBTTempLogger/var/log/goveebttemplogger
        touch GoveeBTTempLogger/var/log/goveebttemplogger/gvh507x.txt
        chmod a+x GoveeBTTempLogger/DEBIAN/postinst GoveeBTTempLogger/DEBIAN/postrm GoveeBTTempLogger/DEBIAN/prerm
        dpkg-deb --build GoveeBTTempLogger

I made the very simple makefile above to both compile the code and build the debian package with the simple command of make deb. It produces the package ‘goveebttemplogger’ in ‘GoveeBTTempLogger.deb’.

I can then install the package and start it running with the command sudo apt-get install ./GoveeBTTempLogger.deb

I can stop and either remove it or purge it with the command sudo apt-get remove goveebttemplogger or sudo apt-get purge goveebttemplogger.

Govee GVH5075 Thermometer Hygrometer

Last week I came across a deal on a small thermometer with display and Bluetooth access for under $10 so I had to give it a try. The fact that the data is available via bluetooth instead of via a web service was a major selling point for me. I am hoping to be able to to log the data via a Raspberry Pi4.

GVH5070 near my Raspberry Pi4

I installed the Govee Home app on my iPhone and it was able to find the device, communicate with it, and pull both current and accumulated data.

When I attempted to find it from my Pi4 it was much more difficult. I live in an apartment with units all around. I’m not just dealing with my own devices that may be visible, but my neighbors as well.

I managed to find the device using linux command line tools, but was not able to successfully connect. A friend suggested BLE Scanner 4.0 for my iPhone for discovering the details, and it was at least able to confirm what I should be looking for using the linux command line tools. I still had timeout issues with the iPhone app, but at least was able to confirm that I could connect to the device and retrieve GUID information.

This is my first time attempting to gather data from a Bluetooth device. I’m still in the research and test phase. I’m listing a bunch of the URLS I’ve found that have been helpful.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Govee/comments/e8ljbp/work_to_access_data_from_a_govee_h5075_indoor/
https://www.jaredwolff.com/get-started-with-bluetooth-low-energy/
https://github.com/neilsheps/GoveeTemperatureAndHumidity
https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=241686
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-setup-bluetooth-on-a-raspberry-pi-3/
https://www.real-world-systems.com/docs/hcitool.1.html

From the command line on my Pi4 I already had the tools installed to try several Bluetooth commands. I believe they were installed as part of the bluez package. The first two commands below get details on the Raspberry Pi Bluetooth hardware, then the hcitool lescan command produced a lot of devices, and I found the line referencing the GVH5075 so I could use the address in further commands.

pi@WimPi4:~ $ sudo hcitool dev
Devices:
        hci0    DC:A6:32:1C:B5:74

pi@WimPi4:~ $ sudo hciconfig -a
hci0:   Type: Primary  Bus: UART
        BD Address: DC:A6:32:1C:B5:74  ACL MTU: 1021:8  SCO MTU: 64:1
        UP RUNNING 
        RX bytes:21284 acl:25 sco:0 events:791 errors:0
        TX bytes:4401 acl:26 sco:0 commands:172 errors:0
        Features: 0xbf 0xfe 0xcf 0xfe 0xdb 0xff 0x7b 0x87
        Packet type: DM1 DM3 DM5 DH1 DH3 DH5 HV1 HV2 HV3 
        Link policy: RSWITCH SNIFF 
        Link mode: SLAVE ACCEPT 
        Name: 'WimPi4'
        Class: 0x000000
        Service Classes: Unspecified
        Device Class: Miscellaneous, 
        HCI Version: 5.0 (0x9)  Revision: 0x13b
        LMP Version: 5.0 (0x9)  Subversion: 0x6119
        Manufacturer: Cypress Semiconductor Corporation (305)

pi@WimPi4:~ $ sudo hcitool lescan
LE Scan ...
7B:F9:68:96:C4:92 (unknown)
57:FA:0A:E7:61:A4 (unknown)
A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE GVH5075_BCAE
A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE (unknown)
15:FF:0C:3F:E7:35 (unknown)
57:FA:0A:E7:61:A4 (unknown)

pi@WimPi4:~ $ sudo hcitool leinfo A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE
Requesting information ...
        Handle: 64 (0x0040)
        LMP Version: 4.2 (0x8) LMP Subversion: 0x22bb
        Manufacturer: Telink Semiconductor Co. Ltd (529)
        Features: 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00

Another command that I attempted before I used the hcitool command was the bluetoothctl command. It scrolls a lot of data, but now that I have an idea what I’m looking at, I may be able to see announcement data from the thermometer periodically in the stream by filtering just to see the data coming from the MAC address.

pi@WimPi4:~ $ sudo bluetoothctl
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller DC:A6:32:1C:B5:74 Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device 57:75:EA:B6:EC:2B 57-75-EA-B6-EC-2B
[NEW] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F 846B219FB80338A3E9
[NEW] Device 48:56:2E:FF:59:45 48-56-2E-FF-59-45
[NEW] Device 46:53:2F:D4:6F:A1 46-53-2F-D4-6F-A1
[NEW] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F 5C-C9-C5-C9-70-5F
[NEW] Device 48:CF:F7:19:4A:3A 48-CF-F7-19-4A-3A
[NEW] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 4E-30-D1-5D-0F-48
[NEW] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 7D-4A-A3-81-32-22
[NEW] Device 7E:0F:63:2B:DC:3E 7E-0F-63-2B-DC-3E
[NEW] Device 7F:5D:37:A2:4E:BA 7F-5D-37-A2-4E-BA
[NEW] Device 7F:6B:44:CD:3A:E5 7F-6B-44-CD-3A-E5
[NEW] Device 00:07:80:37:BD:35 00-07-80-37-BD-35
[NEW] Device 04:52:C7:BC:1C:E3 LE-Bose Revolve SoundLink
[NEW] Device 4F:84:D2:AC:59:FF 4F-84-D2-AC-59-FF
[NEW] Device 4E:F0:6A:DD:3D:7E 4E-F0-6A-DD-3D-7E
[NEW] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 75-25-34-3F-B9-29
[NEW] Device 60:EC:A4:49:B6:67 60-EC-A4-49-B6-67
[NEW] Device 98:D6:BB:20:EB:3B 98-D6-BB-20-EB-3B
[NEW] Device 78:13:28:A8:0A:FF 78-13-28-A8-0A-FF
[NEW] Device 56:6F:B2:E0:40:E3 56-6F-B2-E0-40-E3
[NEW] Device 69:D9:38:44:5C:04 69-D9-38-44-5C-04
[NEW] Device 56:63:50:90:82:D6 56-63-50-90-82-D6
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE RSSI: -43
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Key: 0xec88
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Value:
00 03 32 62 64 00 ..2bd.
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Value:
02 15 49 4e 54 45 4c 4c 49 5f 52 4f 43 4b 53 5f ..INTELLI_ROCKS_
48 57 50 75 f2 ff c2 HWPu…
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 RSSI: -83
[NEW] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E 47-10-2F-15-99-2E
[NEW] Device B8:31:B5:8B:12:D2 ETOBAN386
[NEW] Device F0:6E:0B:D1:1B:BF ELRWLK345
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 RSSI: -72
[CHG] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 RSSI: -89
[CHG] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 RSSI: -81
[CHG] Device 98:D6:BB:20:EB:3B RSSI: -94
[NEW] Device A4:83:E7:20:06:5B A4-83-E7-20-06-5B
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 13 31 68 39 63 51 6f 4b 76 54 34 00 ..1h9cQoKvT4.
[NEW] Device 00:07:80:37:CA:7D 00-07-80-37-CA-7D
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 12 78 4d 32 49 31 6d 31 6a 6f 32 67 ..xM2I1m1jo2g
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 10 01 99 44 de ad be ef 00 0a 00 ca ….D……..
[CHG] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 ManufacturerData Value:
10 06 10 1e b0 2a e1 be …..*..
[CHG] Device 98:D6:BB:20:EB:3B RSSI: -85
[NEW] Device 00:07:80:37:BE:C9 523
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Value:
10 06 5a 1e 56 a0 e1 eb ..Z.V…
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 13 31 68 39 63 51 6f 4b 76 54 34 00 ..1h9cQoKvT4.
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 RSSI: -81
[NEW] Device 6B:C2:D2:28:1E:A5 6B-C2-D2-28-1E-A5
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Value:
0c 0e 00 41 32 56 c8 79 5a 01 9d 63 d5 79 c7 80 …A2V.yZ..c.y..
10 06 56 1e 56 a0 e1 eb ..V.V…
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE RSSI: -35
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Key: 0xec88
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Value:
00 03 32 61 64 00 ..2ad.
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE ManufacturerData Value:
02 15 49 4e 54 45 4c 4c 49 5f 52 4f 43 4b 53 5f ..INTELLI_ROCKS_
48 57 50 75 f2 ff c2 HWPu…
[CHG] Device 48:CF:F7:19:4A:3A RSSI: -76
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 10 01 99 44 de ad be ef 00 0a 00 ca ….D……..
[NEW] Device 78:11:F9:E8:7A:DA 78-11-F9-E8-7A-DA
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E RSSI: -84
[CHG] Device 69:D9:38:44:5C:04 RSSI: -83
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E ManufacturerData Value:
10 06 1c 1e 9a e0 28 9b ……(.
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F ManufacturerData Value:
0c 0e 00 42 32 7b fc b2 b6 a1 46 31 82 0f 67 02 …B2{….F1..g.
10 06 56 1e 56 a0 e1 eb ..V.V…
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 RSSI: -73
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Key: 0x05a7
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F ManufacturerData Value:
03 13 31 68 39 63 51 6f 4b 76 54 34 00 ..1h9cQoKvT4.
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E ManufacturerData Key: 0x004c
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E ManufacturerData Value:
10 06 14 1e 9a e0 28 9b ……(.
[NEW] Device 5C:53:86:8D:A4:61 5C-53-86-8D-A4-61
[NEW] Device 42:32:EC:5F:59:C5 42-32-EC-5F-59-C5
[bluetooth]# scan off
Discovery stopped
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F RSSI is nil
[DEL] Device E7:E7:B4:AB:4A:1F 846B219FB80338A3E9
[CHG] Controller DC:A6:32:1C:B5:74 Discovering: no
[CHG] Device 42:32:EC:5F:59:C5 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 42:32:EC:5F:59:C5 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 5C:53:86:8D:A4:61 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 78:11:F9:E8:7A:DA TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 78:11:F9:E8:7A:DA RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 6B:C2:D2:28:1E:A5 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 6B:C2:D2:28:1E:A5 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:07:80:37:BE:C9 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:07:80:37:CA:7D RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device A4:83:E7:20:06:5B RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device F0:6E:0B:D1:1B:BF TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device F0:6E:0B:D1:1B:BF RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device B8:31:B5:8B:12:D2 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device B8:31:B5:8B:12:D2 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device A4:C1:38:37:BC:AE RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 56:63:50:90:82:D6 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 69:D9:38:44:5C:04 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 69:D9:38:44:5C:04 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 56:6F:B2:E0:40:E3 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 56:6F:B2:E0:40:E3 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 78:13:28:A8:0A:FF TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 78:13:28:A8:0A:FF RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 98:D6:BB:20:EB:3B RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 60:EC:A4:49:B6:67 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 60:EC:A4:49:B6:67 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 4E:F0:6A:DD:3D:7E TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 4E:F0:6A:DD:3D:7E RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 4F:84:D2:AC:59:FF TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 4F:84:D2:AC:59:FF RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 04:52:C7:BC:1C:E3 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 04:52:C7:BC:1C:E3 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:07:80:37:BD:35 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7F:6B:44:CD:3A:E5 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 7F:6B:44:CD:3A:E5 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7F:5D:37:A2:4E:BA TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 7F:5D:37:A2:4E:BA RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7E:0F:63:2B:DC:3E TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 7E:0F:63:2B:DC:3E RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 48:CF:F7:19:4A:3A TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 48:CF:F7:19:4A:3A RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 46:53:2F:D4:6F:A1 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 46:53:2F:D4:6F:A1 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 48:56:2E:FF:59:45 TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 48:56:2E:FF:59:45 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 57:75:EA:B6:EC:2B TxPower is nil
[CHG] Device 57:75:EA:B6:EC:2B RSSI is nil
[DEL] Device 57:75:EA:B6:EC:2B 57-75-EA-B6-EC-2B
[DEL] Device 48:56:2E:FF:59:45 48-56-2E-FF-59-45
[DEL] Device 46:53:2F:D4:6F:A1 46-53-2F-D4-6F-A1
[DEL] Device 5C:C9:C5:C9:70:5F 5C-C9-C5-C9-70-5F
[DEL] Device 48:CF:F7:19:4A:3A 48-CF-F7-19-4A-3A
[DEL] Device 4E:30:D1:5D:0F:48 4E-30-D1-5D-0F-48
[DEL] Device 7D:4A:A3:81:32:22 7D-4A-A3-81-32-22
[DEL] Device 7E:0F:63:2B:DC:3E 7E-0F-63-2B-DC-3E
[DEL] Device 7F:5D:37:A2:4E:BA 7F-5D-37-A2-4E-BA
[DEL] Device 7F:6B:44:CD:3A:E5 7F-6B-44-CD-3A-E5
[DEL] Device 00:07:80:37:BD:35 00-07-80-37-BD-35
[DEL] Device 04:52:C7:BC:1C:E3 LE-Bose Revolve SoundLink
[DEL] Device 4F:84:D2:AC:59:FF 4F-84-D2-AC-59-FF
[DEL] Device 4E:F0:6A:DD:3D:7E 4E-F0-6A-DD-3D-7E
[DEL] Device 75:25:34:3F:B9:29 75-25-34-3F-B9-29
[DEL] Device 60:EC:A4:49:B6:67 60-EC-A4-49-B6-67
[DEL] Device 98:D6:BB:20:EB:3B 98-D6-BB-20-EB-3B
[DEL] Device 78:13:28:A8:0A:FF 78-13-28-A8-0A-FF
[DEL] Device 56:6F:B2:E0:40:E3 56-6F-B2-E0-40-E3
[DEL] Device 69:D9:38:44:5C:04 69-D9-38-44-5C-04
[DEL] Device 56:63:50:90:82:D6 56-63-50-90-82-D6
[DEL] Device 47:10:2F:15:99:2E 47-10-2F-15-99-2E
[DEL] Device B8:31:B5:8B:12:D2 ETOBAN386
[DEL] Device F0:6E:0B:D1:1B:BF ELRWLK345
[DEL] Device A4:83:E7:20:06:5B A4-83-E7-20-06-5B
[DEL] Device 00:07:80:37:CA:7D 00-07-80-37-CA-7D
[DEL] Device 00:07:80:37:BE:C9 523
[DEL] Device 6B:C2:D2:28:1E:A5 6B-C2-D2-28-1E-A5
[DEL] Device 78:11:F9:E8:7A:DA 78-11-F9-E8-7A-DA
[DEL] Device 5C:53:86:8D:A4:61 5C-53-86-8D-A4-61
[DEL] Device 42:32:EC:5F:59:C5 42-32-EC-5F-59-C5
[bluetooth]# exit

I’m posting all of this here and hopefully will be able to make progress on retrieving the data in the next few days.

5GHz WiFi on Raspberry Pi 4

In my post about quickly setting up a headless Raspberry I had a simple wpa_supplicant.conf file example. This week I got a Raspberry Pi 4, which according to the documentation supports 5GHz networks and 802.11ac.

I’d been running the command sudo iwlist wlan0 scan | grep ESSID and only seeing 2.4GHz networks.

It occurred to me that I’d seen some people in other countries putting the country detail in their wpa_supplicant.conf file, so I decided to see if it made a difference. Sure enough, after adding the line country=US to my file I was able to see 5GHz networks as well as 2.4GHz networks.

ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
update_config=1
country=US

network={
       ssid="MyNetworkSSID"
       psk="MyNetworkPassword"
}
After a bit of reading on the https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/wireless/wireless-cli.md page, I noticed a section that made this point with the Pi 3B+, but because I’d not used a 3B+, I didn’t realize it supported 5GHz networking as well.
On the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, you will also need to set the country code, so that the 5G networking can choose the correct frequency bands. You can either use the raspi-config application and select the localisation option, or edit the wpa_supplicant.conf file and add the following. (Note you need to replace ‘GB’ with the ISO code of your country. See Wikipedia for a list of country codes.)

Headless Raspberry Pi Setup

I’ve been using a raspberry pi as a ADSB data feeder for FlightAware and FlightRadar24 for a while and the micro sd card developed a bad sector. That meant I needed to rebuild the installation. I really didn’t want to deal with connecting a keyboard, monitor, and mouse to the Pi for the installation. I found https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/raspberry-pi-zerow-headless-wifi-setup.html giving me useful information on how to avoid all that. I’m documenting my steps here for my own memory.

Step 1. Download the most recent version of Raspian Buster Lite from https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/

Step 2. Download balenaEtcher portable from https://www.balena.io/etcher/

Step 3. Use Etcher to overwrite an SD card with the Raspian image I downloaded earlier.

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Step 4. Eject the flash card and close Etcher, then insert the flash card again, rejecting the option to format the drive.  The flash card is now formatted with multiple partitions, only the first is easily read in windows.

Step 5. create two files on the sd card boot partition. ssh and wpa_supplicant.conf. ssh is an empty file. wpa_supplicant.conf should have the following contents, customized for your WiFi Network:

ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
update_config=1
country=US

network={
       ssid="MyNetworkSSID"
       psk="MyNetworkPassword"
}

Step 6. Eject your micro sd card, put it in the Raspberry Pi and power on the raspberry. You’ll need to wait a couple of minutes for the raspberry to finish several steps before you can connect to it over the network. The Raspberry Pi is expanding the native filesystem to fill the available space on the flash card, then rebooting another time with the new filesystem. You’ll need to figure out what IP address the Raspberry retrieved on your network. If you have access to your router, you may be able to see the attached devices and find the new Raspberry that way. I like the NirSoft Wireless Network Watcher to find what’s on my network https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wireless_network_watcher.html.

Step 7. Connect to the Raspberry Pi with ssh. You’ll be using the default user and password to connect: “pi” and “raspberry”. I used the new Microsoft Windows Terminal in Windows 10 for this example. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/windows-terminal-preview/9n0dx20hk701#activetab=pivot:overviewtab

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The Raspberry is up and running now. There are several steps I recommend to do immediately. Use sudo raspi-config to set the user password, the machine hostname, and the timezone you want the machine to use.

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After waiting for the raspberry to reboot and reconnecting via ssh, updating the software to the latest version is the next step.

sudo apt-get update -y
sudo apt-get upgrade -y
sudo shutdown -r now

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Then I install several tools that I like to have.

sudo apt-get install lighttpd mc mrtg lrzsz nmap dnsutils etherwake snmpd snmp arp-scan shairport-sync -y

My next steps are to get PiAware and FlightRadar up and running.