exiftool to manage DJI media files

DJI Drones don’t seem to remember the image count between formats of a media card. This creates a problem for me when I’m trying to backup and maintain my images and video.

Because the dates are all correct in the media files, retrieved from GPS data, organizing the files by naming them based on the date works for me.

Using ExifTool by Phil Harvey is a great solution for pulling the metadata from the files and renaming the files.

The command line that I was initially using is:

exiftool "-FileName<${CreateDate}.$filetype" -d %Y%m%d-%H%M%S%%-c -ext mp4 -ext dng -ext jpg dji*

It’s problem is that it orphans the SRT subtitle files from my videos that I’d like to keep matching the video files.

I’ve tried this variation to do it in one step but it doesn’t work, because the SRT files get renamed as MP4 files.

exiftool -verbose "-FileName<${CreateDate}" -d %Y%m%d-%H%M%S%%-c.%%le -ext mp4 -ext dng -ext jpg dji* -srcfile %f.srt

If anyone has a suggestion for how to rename all the media files in one directory I’d appreciate it. Even running two commands in sequence would be fine.

Update:

I’ve figured out that running these two commands in sequence will get me the results I am looking for:

exiftool "-FileName<${CreateDate}" -d %Y%m%d-%H%M%S%%-c.srt -ext mp4 -srcfile %f.srt dji*
exiftool "-FileName<${CreateDate}" -d %Y%m%d-%H%M%S%%-c.%%le -ext mp4 -ext dng -ext jpg dji*

I’m still looking for a way of doing it in a single command that may leave less room for error, but this is working for now.

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Lily Pond

Lily Pond

Lily Pond, Washington Park, Chicago, Ill., U. S. A.

This is the last of the stereograph pictures I had to scan, and the only one in color. It’s interesting how only the green color remains.

I don’t know if a color photography system was originally used and the colors other than green have faded, or if the color was added later. I suspect the former.

Spanish Torpedo

Spanish Torpedo Taken from Harbor of Santiago

Spanish Torpedo Taken from Harbor of Santiago.

In modern warfare explosives are coming more and more into use. Streets and thoroughfares as well as rivers, straights and harbors over which it is thought the enemy may pass, are mined with deadly explosives sufficiently powerful to wreck the mightiest battleship or overwhelm a large land force. Torpedoes are usually made in forms similar to a cigar, so that they may be projected under water, the sharp end going forward. As is well known, they can be arranged to explode by contact, a time fuse, or an electric wire. The sample death dealing instrument shown in this view provided with contact arms which, when struck, thrust a spike into the interior as shown, causing explosion by percussion. Doubtless it was some such contrivance as one of those described above, which, on Feb. 15th, 1898, tore into shred and sent to the bottom of Havana Harbor, our proud battleship “Maine,” together with nearly her entire crew.

Royal Gorge

Royal Gorge

Royal Gorge (Grand Canyon of the Arkansas), Colorado, U. S. A.

“Oh! the power that piled these wonders
As the mountains took their stations;
As a great red belt rose upward in a glittering zone of fire.” — Ferguson.

The crowning wonder of Colorado is the world famed Royal Gorge. Its rock piled crags tower above the river at this point 2,600 feet. The narrow and broad gauge railroad running through the canon is one of the greatest pieces of railroad engineering ever accomplished.

And We Just Went Smashed

I found this set of images interesting because of how mundane it seems, and also the information printed on it.

Ingersoll View Company St. Paul, Minn.  U. S. A.
High Grade Original View Sold only by Subscription.

I created three frames in this GIF, the first is background, the second slides the left photo over the right, the third slides the right photo over the left. I aligned the photos using the tree in the center of the frame. The overlap of the photos and the text really shows how misaligned the original photos were.

The Library of Congress has several stereograph cards by this company, but I didn’t find this particular one. I don’t know how often subscription photos were sent out. or what the general quality of the subscriptions may have been.

And We Just Went Smashed

“And We Just Went Smashed–(illustrated.)