Monitoring Raspberry Pi with MRTG

I’ve used MRTG for simple monitoring for years. It’s easy to get working and dependent on very few packages. It stores it’s data in simple files. This both limits it, and makes it easy to move or duplicate.

I wanted to monitor each of my Raspberry Pi network interfaces because they are connected via WiFi and I can’t monitor a particular switch port for each device. I’ve spent nearly a year searching for the reason that MRTG didn’t enumerate the interfaces before coming up with a simple snippet fixing my problem.

Adding this line to the end of my /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf file and restarting the snmpd allowed me to run cfgmaker and see my network interfaces.

view   systemonly  included   .1.3.6.1.2.1.2

Quick and dirty addition and query:

sudo echo view   systemonly  included   .1.3.6.1.2.1.2 >>/etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
sudo systemctl restart snmpd

/usr/bin/cfgmaker --no-down --zero-speed=100000000 public@localhost
Thanks to https://www.seei.biz/cpu-temperature-of-a-raspberry-pi-via-snmp/ for giving me the simple answer that I’d been trying to figure out for over a year.

Access Windows share from Raspberry Pi

I have a shared directory from my windows server that I’d like to read and write from my Raspberry Pi. I want the share to be automatically available on my Raspberry Pi whenever both the Raspberry and the Windows server are running, but I don’t want the system to spend too much time hung up if the windows server is not available. My easy solution is below.

My Windows servername is Acid. The share I want to connect to is Web. The IP address of the server is 192.168.0.12.

sudo echo 192.168.0.12 Acid>>/etc/hosts
sudo mkdir --parents /media/acid/web
sudo echo username=WindowsUsername >/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials
sudo echo password=WindowsPassword >>/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials
sudo echo domain=OptionalDomainName >>/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials
sudo chmod 0600 /etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials
sudo echo //acid/web /media/acid/web/ cifs credentials=/etc/wimsworld.smb.credentials,noauto,x-systemd.automount,x-systemd.idle-timeout=1min,_netdev 0 0>>/etc/fstab

That series of commands, with the correct details in the credentials, and the system automounter will automatically attempt to connect whenever there’s an access under /media/acid/web and then disconnect again after it’s been idle for over a minute.

I needed to add Acid to my local hosts file because the name doesn’t resolve from the DNS server the raspberry pi is using.

I put the windows Username/Password and Domain in a file with only read/write permissions to root so that it wasn’t clear text in the fstab file for anyone on the machine to read.

I did all of this on a machine that had been built from the Raspian Buster Lite image from 2019-07-10. I didn’t explicitly install the cifs-utils package. It might be needed on other distributions.

Raspberry Pi ZeroW Camera Focus with FFMPEG

I wanted a quick and dirty method to test my camera module installation on my Raspberry Pi ZeroW installation. I don’t have a monitor connected to the Raspberry, and explicitly did not install the desktop version of the operating system. This is especially important because the camera itself may not be properly focused after installation in the case, and the only way to easily focus the camera is with a video stream allowing you to make small adjustments and see them nearly real time.

I’ve used FFMPEG for years as it handles almost any kind of video or audio I can throw at it. I use VLC on my desktop machine for similar reasons.

I did a quick install of ffmpeg on my Pi with the following command, allowing it to install all the requirements, adding up to almost 126 new packages and 56MB that needed to be downloaded and installed.

sudo apt-get install ffmpeg -y

After it finished installing, I was able to run the following command with the 192.168.0.16 address being my desktop computer.

ffmpeg -f video4linux2 -input_format h264 -video_size 1280x720 -framerate 30 -i /dev/video0 -vcodec copy -an -f mpegts udp://192.168.0.16:5000?pkt_size=1316

On my desktop computer I ran VLC, under the Media menu, selected Open Network Stream, and opened:

udp://@0.0.0.0:5000

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What I’m doing is to use FFMPEG to pull video from the device and push it using UDP datagrams at my desktop on port 5000. Then VLC opens a port on the local machine at port 5000 to receive the datagrams and it decodes and displays the video. An interesting thing about this method is that I can stop transmitting from the raspberry, then restart it, and VLC will accept the packets since UDP is a connectionless protocol.

What really surprised me was that when I logged in a second time to my Raspberry Pi to view the CPU usage for streaming, it was only running around 12% of the CPU. I was interested in knowing what native formats the camera supported..

ffmpeg -f v4l2 -list_formats all -i /dev/video0
ffmpeg version 4.1.4-1+rpt1~deb10u1 Copyright (c) 2000-2019 the FFmpeg developers
  built with gcc 8 (Raspbian 8.3.0-6+rpi1)
  configuration: --prefix=/usr --extra-version='1+rpt1~deb10u1' --toolchain=hardened --libdir=/usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf --incdir=/usr/include/arm-linux-gnueabihf --arch=arm --enable-gpl --disable-stripping --enable-avresample --disable-filter=resample --enable-avisynth --enable-gnutls --enable-ladspa --enable-libaom --enable-libass --enable-libbluray --enable-libbs2b --enable-libcaca --enable-libcdio --enable-libcodec2 --enable-libflite --enable-libfontconfig --enable-libfreetype --enable-libfribidi --enable-libgme --enable-libgsm --enable-libjack --enable-libmp3lame --enable-libmysofa --enable-libopenjpeg --enable-libopenmpt --enable-libopus --enable-libpulse --enable-librsvg --enable-librubberband --enable-libshine --enable-libsnappy --enable-libsoxr --enable-libspeex --enable-libssh --enable-libtheora --enable-libtwolame --enable-libvidstab --enable-libvorbis --enable-libvpx --enable-libwavpack --enable-libwebp --enable-libx265 --enable-libxml2 --enable-libxvid --enable-libzmq --enable-libzvbi --enable-lv2 --enable-omx --enable-openal --enable-opengl --enable-sdl2 --enable-omx-rpi --enable-mmal --enable-libdc1394 --enable-libdrm --enable-libiec61883 --enable-chromaprint --enable-frei0r --enable-libx264 --enable-shared
  libavutil      56. 22.100 / 56. 22.100
  libavcodec     58. 35.100 / 58. 35.100
  libavformat    58. 20.100 / 58. 20.100
  libavdevice    58.  5.100 / 58.  5.100
  libavfilter     7. 40.101 /  7. 40.101
  libavresample   4.  0.  0 /  4.  0.  0
  libswscale      5.  3.100 /  5.  3.100
  libswresample   3.  3.100 /  3.  3.100
  libpostproc    55.  3.100 / 55.  3.100
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :     yuv420p :     Planar YUV 4:2:0 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :     yuyv422 :           YUYV 4:2:2 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :       rgb24 :     24-bit RGB 8-8-8 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Compressed:       mjpeg :            JFIF JPEG : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Compressed:        h264 :                H.264 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Compressed:       mjpeg :          Motion-JPEG : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       : Unsupported :           YVYU 4:2:2 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       : Unsupported :           VYUY 4:2:2 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :     uyvy422 :           UYVY 4:2:2 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :        nv12 :         Y/CbCr 4:2:0 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :       bgr24 :     24-bit BGR 8-8-8 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :     yuv420p :     Planar YVU 4:2:0 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       : Unsupported :         Y/CrCb 4:2:0 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
[video4linux2,v4l2 @ 0x2367e40] Raw       :        bgr0 : 32-bit BGRA/X 8-8-8-8 : {32-3280, 2}x{32-2464, 2}
/dev/video0: Immediate exit requested

That output leads me to believe that the camera module could output either h264 or mjpeg without significant CPU overhead. What it doesn’t do is tell me efficient frame sizes. It seems to say that horizontal and vertical sizes can be anything between 32 to 3280 and 32 to 2464. I know that the specs on the camera say that it will run still frames at the high resolution, but video is significantly less.

Two Video4Linux commands that return interesting and similar results are:

pi@WimPiZeroCamera:~ $ v4l2-ctl --list-formats-ext
ioctl: VIDIOC_ENUM_FMT
        Type: Video Capture

        [0]: 'YU12' (Planar YUV 4:2:0)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [1]: 'YUYV' (YUYV 4:2:2)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [2]: 'RGB3' (24-bit RGB 8-8-8)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [3]: 'JPEG' (JFIF JPEG, compressed)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [4]: 'H264' (H.264, compressed)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [5]: 'MJPG' (Motion-JPEG, compressed)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [6]: 'YVYU' (YVYU 4:2:2)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [7]: 'VYUY' (VYUY 4:2:2)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [8]: 'UYVY' (UYVY 4:2:2)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [9]: 'NV12' (Y/CbCr 4:2:0)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [10]: 'BGR3' (24-bit BGR 8-8-8)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [11]: 'YV12' (Planar YVU 4:2:0)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [12]: 'NV21' (Y/CrCb 4:2:0)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
        [13]: 'BGR4' (32-bit BGRA/X 8-8-8-8)
                Size: Stepwise 32x32 - 3280x2464 with step 2/2
pi@WimPiZeroCamera:~ $ v4l2-ctl -L

User Controls

                     brightness 0x00980900 (int)    : min=0 max=100 step=1 default=50 value=50 flags=slider
                       contrast 0x00980901 (int)    : min=-100 max=100 step=1 default=0 value=0 flags=slider
                     saturation 0x00980902 (int)    : min=-100 max=100 step=1 default=0 value=0 flags=slider
                    red_balance 0x0098090e (int)    : min=1 max=7999 step=1 default=1000 value=1000 flags=slider
                   blue_balance 0x0098090f (int)    : min=1 max=7999 step=1 default=1000 value=1000 flags=slider
                horizontal_flip 0x00980914 (bool)   : default=0 value=0
                  vertical_flip 0x00980915 (bool)   : default=0 value=0
           power_line_frequency 0x00980918 (menu)   : min=0 max=3 default=1 value=1
                                0: Disabled
                                1: 50 Hz
                                2: 60 Hz
                                3: Auto
                      sharpness 0x0098091b (int)    : min=-100 max=100 step=1 default=0 value=0 flags=slider
                  color_effects 0x0098091f (menu)   : min=0 max=15 default=0 value=0
                                0: None
                                1: Black & White
                                2: Sepia
                                3: Negative
                                4: Emboss
                                5: Sketch
                                6: Sky Blue
                                7: Grass Green
                                8: Skin Whiten
                                9: Vivid
                                10: Aqua
                                11: Art Freeze
                                12: Silhouette
                                13: Solarization
                                14: Antique
                                15: Set Cb/Cr
                         rotate 0x00980922 (int)    : min=0 max=360 step=90 default=0 value=0 flags=modify-layout
             color_effects_cbcr 0x0098092a (int)    : min=0 max=65535 step=1 default=32896 value=32896

Codec Controls

             video_bitrate_mode 0x009909ce (menu)   : min=0 max=1 default=0 value=0 flags=update
                                0: Variable Bitrate
                                1: Constant Bitrate
                  video_bitrate 0x009909cf (int)    : min=25000 max=25000000 step=25000 default=10000000 value=10000000
         repeat_sequence_header 0x009909e2 (bool)   : default=0 value=0
            h264_i_frame_period 0x00990a66 (int)    : min=0 max=2147483647 step=1 default=60 value=60
                     h264_level 0x00990a67 (menu)   : min=0 max=11 default=11 value=11
                                0: 1
                                1: 1b
                                2: 1.1
                                3: 1.2
                                4: 1.3
                                5: 2
                                6: 2.1
                                7: 2.2
                                8: 3
                                9: 3.1
                                10: 3.2
                                11: 4
                   h264_profile 0x00990a6b (menu)   : min=0 max=4 default=4 value=4
                                0: Baseline
                                1: Constrained Baseline
                                2: Main
                                4: High

Camera Controls

                  auto_exposure 0x009a0901 (menu)   : min=0 max=3 default=0 value=0
                                0: Auto Mode
                                1: Manual Mode
         exposure_time_absolute 0x009a0902 (int)    : min=1 max=10000 step=1 default=1000 value=1000
     exposure_dynamic_framerate 0x009a0903 (bool)   : default=0 value=0
             auto_exposure_bias 0x009a0913 (intmenu): min=0 max=24 default=12 value=12
                                0: -4000 (0xfffffffffffff060)
                                1: -3667 (0xfffffffffffff1ad)
                                2: -3333 (0xfffffffffffff2fb)
                                3: -3000 (0xfffffffffffff448)
                                4: -2667 (0xfffffffffffff595)
                                5: -2333 (0xfffffffffffff6e3)
                                6: -2000 (0xfffffffffffff830)
                                7: -1667 (0xfffffffffffff97d)
                                8: -1333 (0xfffffffffffffacb)
                                9: -1000 (0xfffffffffffffc18)
                                10: -667 (0xfffffffffffffd65)
                                11: -333 (0xfffffffffffffeb3)
                                12: 0 (0x0)
                                13: 333 (0x14d)
                                14: 667 (0x29b)
                                15: 1000 (0x3e8)
                                16: 1333 (0x535)
                                17: 1667 (0x683)
                                18: 2000 (0x7d0)
                                19: 2333 (0x91d)
                                20: 2667 (0xa6b)
                                21: 3000 (0xbb8)
                                22: 3333 (0xd05)
                                23: 3667 (0xe53)
                                24: 4000 (0xfa0)
      white_balance_auto_preset 0x009a0914 (menu)   : min=0 max=9 default=1 value=1
                                0: Manual
                                1: Auto
                                2: Incandescent
                                3: Fluorescent
                                4: Fluorescent H
                                5: Horizon
                                6: Daylight
                                7: Flash
                                8: Cloudy
                                9: Shade
            image_stabilization 0x009a0916 (bool)   : default=0 value=0
                iso_sensitivity 0x009a0917 (intmenu): min=0 max=4 default=0 value=0
                                0: 0 (0x0)
                                1: 100000 (0x186a0)
                                2: 200000 (0x30d40)
                                3: 400000 (0x61a80)
                                4: 800000 (0xc3500)
           iso_sensitivity_auto 0x009a0918 (menu)   : min=0 max=1 default=1 value=1
                                0: Manual
                                1: Auto
         exposure_metering_mode 0x009a0919 (menu)   : min=0 max=2 default=0 value=0
                                0: Average
                                1: Center Weighted
                                2: Spot
                     scene_mode 0x009a091a (menu)   : min=0 max=13 default=0 value=0
                                0: None
                                8: Night
                                11: Sports

JPEG Compression Controls

            compression_quality 0x009d0903 (int)    : min=1 max=100 step=1 default=30 value=30

 

 

5GHz WiFi on Raspberry Pi 4

In my post about quickly setting up a headless Raspberry I had a simple wpa_supplicant.conf file example. This week I got a Raspberry Pi 4, which according to the documentation supports 5GHz networks and 802.11ac.

I’d been running the command sudo iwlist wlan0 scan | grep ESSID and only seeing 2.4GHz networks.

It occurred to me that I’d seen some people in other countries putting the country detail in their wpa_supplicant.conf file, so I decided to see if it made a difference. Sure enough, after adding the line country=US to my file I was able to see 5GHz networks as well as 2.4GHz networks.

ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
update_config=1
country=US

network={
       ssid="MyNetworkSSID"
       psk="MyNetworkPassword"
}
After a bit of reading on the https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/wireless/wireless-cli.md page, I noticed a section that made this point with the Pi 3B+, but because I’d not used a 3B+, I didn’t realize it supported 5GHz networking as well.
On the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, you will also need to set the country code, so that the 5G networking can choose the correct frequency bands. You can either use the raspi-config application and select the localisation option, or edit the wpa_supplicant.conf file and add the following. (Note you need to replace ‘GB’ with the ISO code of your country. See Wikipedia for a list of country codes.)

Raspberry PiZeroW Camera Module

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When you’ve gotten used to Amazon Prime and free shipping, purchasing inexpensive items from other online retailers where the shipping doubles the cost of the item makes it harder to impulse buy items. An item for $5 that costs $7 in shipping often doesn’t get bought. Even a pair of items that cost $16 together that then cost $7 in shipping cause me to delay the purchase.

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Because I was purchasing a Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspberry Pi USB-C Power Supply from Sparkfun, I decided to throw in another Pi ZeroW and case for another $16. I then added the Raspberry Pi Camera module because the case has an optional cover enclosing the camera and I wanted to see how it all worked together. I only wish I’d realized that there was a Noir version, because I’ve always wanted to play with infrared photography.

Having recently streamlined the installation of a Pi Zero, I installed the camera and Pi ZeroW in the case, put the configured micro sd card in place, plugged it into my HDMI monitor just to watch it boot and applied power. I never saw anything on the monitor. The Pi ZeroW only has a single LED, which is generally on, but blinks for micro sd activity. Because I’d closed the case, the LED wasn’t visible, and with no monitor activity I was wondering if I’d gotten a bad board.

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I opened the case and powered it on again, this time I knew I was seeing LED activity. I did a quick search of my network for new devices and found the new board was responding on ssh and appeared to be working correctly other than no HDMI output.  I was even able to take a snapshot with the camera using the command:

raspistill -o image.jpg

I decided to test booting the device without the camera installed. That worked fine, and I had HDMI output during the boot process. Now I started to wonder if perhaps the power supply I was using didn’t provide enough power. Perhaps the camera and the HDMI device were mutually exclusive in the amount of power required

A lot of searching on the web resulted in nothing about the power required for the camera affecting the HDMI output. I found that I might be able to reduce the power requirements by 25mA by turning off the HDMI, but that the Pi ZeroW was already the lowest power draw available. https://www.jeffgeerling.com/blogs/jeff-geerling/raspberry-pi-zero-conserve-energy

I found the tvservice command and the -s option with the camera installed was resulting in a different result from without the camera installed.

pi@WimPiZeroCamera:~ $ sudo /usr/bin/tvservice -s
state 0x40000 [NTSC 4:3], 720x480 @ 60.00Hz, interlaced
pi@WimPiZeroW:~ $ sudo /usr/bin/tvservice -s
state 0xa [HDMI CEA (16) RGB lim 16:9], 1920x1080 @ 60.00Hz, progressive

At least recognizing that difference was progress. For some reason under Raspian Buster the camera module is causing the HDMI output to be different. I found options in https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/config-txt/video.md that allow me to force the HDMI output to what I want. I changed /boot/config.txt with the following and now I’ve got both camera and video working properly.

# uncomment to force a specific HDMI mode (this will force [HDMI CEA (16) RGB lim 16:9], 1920x1080 @ 60.00Hz, progressive)
hdmi_group=1
hdmi_mode=16

I hope that this helps someone else having problems with both camera and hdmi video output. I don’t know if this was specific to Buster since I never tried it under Jessie or Stretch.

Headless Raspberry Pi Setup

I’ve been using a raspberry pi as a ADSB data feeder for FlightAware and FlightRadar24 for a while and the micro sd card developed a bad sector. That meant I needed to rebuild the installation. I really didn’t want to deal with connecting a keyboard, monitor, and mouse to the Pi for the installation. I found https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/raspberry-pi-zerow-headless-wifi-setup.html giving me useful information on how to avoid all that. I’m documenting my steps here for my own memory.

Step 1. Download the most recent version of Raspian Buster Lite from https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/

Step 2. Download balenaEtcher portable from https://www.balena.io/etcher/

Step 3. Use Etcher to overwrite an SD card with the Raspian image I downloaded earlier.

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Step 4. Eject the flash card and close Etcher, then insert the flash card again, rejecting the option to format the drive.  The flash card is now formatted with multiple partitions, only the first is easily read in windows.

Step 5. create two files on the sd card boot partition. ssh and wpa_supplicant.conf. ssh is an empty file. wpa_supplicant.conf should have the following contents, customized for your WiFi Network:

ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
update_config=1
country=US

network={
       ssid="MyNetworkSSID"
       psk="MyNetworkPassword"
}

Step 6. Eject your micro sd card, put it in the Raspberry Pi and power on the raspberry. You’ll need to wait a couple of minutes for the raspberry to finish several steps before you can connect to it over the network. The Raspberry Pi is expanding the native filesystem to fill the available space on the flash card, then rebooting another time with the new filesystem. You’ll need to figure out what IP address the Raspberry retrieved on your network. If you have access to your router, you may be able to see the attached devices and find the new Raspberry that way. I like the NirSoft Wireless Network Watcher to find what’s on my network https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wireless_network_watcher.html.

Step 7. Connect to the Raspberry Pi with ssh. You’ll be using the default user and password to connect: “pi” and “raspberry”. I used the new Microsoft Windows Terminal in Windows 10 for this example. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/windows-terminal-preview/9n0dx20hk701#activetab=pivot:overviewtab

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The Raspberry is up and running now. There are several steps I recommend to do immediately. Use sudo raspi-config to set the user password, the machine hostname, and the timezone you want the machine to use.

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After waiting for the raspberry to reboot and reconnecting via ssh, updating the software to the latest version is the next step.

sudo apt-get update -y
sudo apt-get upgrade -y
sudo shutdown -r now

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Then I install several tools that I like to have.

sudo apt-get install lighttpd mc mrtg lrzsz nmap dnsutils etherwake snmpd snmp arp-scan shairport-sync -y

My next steps are to get PiAware and FlightRadar up and running.

Logitech C920 Angle of View

I realized today that the Logitech C920 webcam produces images covering a different field of vision (FOV) for the same width based on the height. I was expecting the horizontal field to be the same for a given width but it was not.

Using the command ffmpeg -f video4linux2 -list_formats all -i /dev/video0 to retrieve the sizes of video available lists the same set of sizes for h264 and mjpeg. 640×480 160×90 160×120 176×144 320×180 320×240 352×288 432×240 640×360 800×448 800×600 864×480 960×720 1024×576 1280×720 1600×896 1920×1080. In Raw/yuyv422 mode two additional sizes are available. 2304×1296 2304×1536.

I pointed my webcam at the building out my window, giving myself a rough grid pattern to look at and ran it through all of the h.264 sizes, and manually counted the horizontal and vertical blocks visible. 

I expected 640×480 and 640×360 to be the same horizontal FOV but have different vertical FOV. What actually happened in the FOV was that they displayed the same vertical FOV but different horizontal FOV.

I ran through all of the h264 resolutions, and the vertical FOV appeared to shrink slightly when I requested resolutions below 200, but otherwise stayed the same. 

Selecting 2304×1536 produced a slightly larger vertical FOV with the same horizontal FOV as 1920×1080. 2304×1296 seemed to produce the same FOV in both directions as 1920×1080.  Both of these resolutions run at lower frame rates and only in raw mode. I was testing them using ffmpeg transcoding and sending to my windows desktop with the command: ffmpeg -re -f v4l2 -video_size 2304×1536 -framerate 2 -input_format yuyv422 -i /dev/video0 -f mpegts udp://192.168.0.10:8090

The C920 advertises a Diagonal FOV of 78°, but I didn’t find official meaning of that.  I found a nice bit of information at http://therandomlab.blogspot.com/2013/03/logitech-c920-and-c910-fields-of-view.html that describes it as explicitly as being when the camera is running in 16×9 mode. 

I will probably get around to writing a program to more accurately produce the results.  Here’s my manual table:

Resolution Width Height Blocks Floors Width/Height Ratio MegaPixels
160×90  160 90 9 8 1.777778 0.01
160×120  160 120 7 8 1.333333 0.01
176×144  176 144 7 9 1.222222 0.02
320×180  320 180 9 8 1.777778 0.05
320×240  320 240 7 9 1.333333 0.07
352×288  352 288 7 9 1.222222 0.1
432×240  432 240 10 9 1.8 0.1
640×360  640 360 10 9 1.777778 0.23
640×480  640 480 7 9 1.333333 0.3
800×448  800 448 10 9 1.785714 0.35
800×600  800 600 7 9 1.333333 0.48
864×480  864 480 10 9 1.8 0.41
960×720  960 720 7 9 1.333333 0.69
1024×576  1024 576 10 9 1.777778 0.58
1280×720  1280 720 10 9 1.777778 0.92
1600×896  1600 896 10 9 1.785714 1.43
1920×1080 1920 1080 10 9 1.777778 2.07
2304×1296 2304 1296     1.777778 2.98
2304×1536 2304 1536     1.5 3.53
  16 9     1.777778
  4 3     1.333333