Part 3 of ROAV Dash Cam C1 Pro

After getting the video files from my dashcam strung together at high speed I realized I was just as interested in the GPS data that was stored in .info files alongside each .mp4 file.

Some digging around in forums led me to believe that the files were fairly simple comma separated files with the headers working out to beĀ Datetime, Latitude, Longitude, FixType, SatCount, Altitude, SpeedKph, Heading, AccelerometerX, AccelerometerY, AccelerometerZ. The Datetime field is it’s own special format, but easy enough to interpret.

Because I’ve written a GPS data app in the past, I’d learned how to write Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files, as well as learning to use ZIP routines to package them into KMZ files. My original code had hard coded the KML tags because I didn’t want to rely on an external library requirement on a limited platform. In re-using the code I updated to use the XMLLite API. Microsoft may be discontinuing support for this API as well, but at least now it’s still included with current operating systems. The advantage of using the XML API to create the XML is knowing that all of the tags are properly and consistently formed and closed. A secondary feature was that it made it much simpler to explore different data formatting options for the folders in the KML structure.

ROAV-ConCatStructureI worked on the basic idea that the most interesting data from the source files was based on speed and altitude. Then I broke the data into segments by the day, so if I store multiple days worth of files the kml will automatically have reasonable breaks in it. I create a Placemark that includes a LineString with all the GPS coordinates for the day. I calculate the distance by multiplying the reported speed by the time between points.

The calculated distance isn’t as accurate as I’d like, but the code I had from years ago didn’t seem to get more accurate distances. My web references from years ago no longer work, which is the frustrating thing about pointing to documentation on the web. The code I’d used years before was used in a bicycle gps program, which meant that the speeds were slower and the distance traveled between points may have been smaller. The data the ROAV is writing to the log file may not have as many significant digits as the raw data available from the the GPS chip itself.

I create three more Placemarks for each day, each with a simple Point defined. Max Speed, Max Altitude, and Min Altitude. Each of those data points is selected from a simple scan of the input data.

ROAV-ConCatVideo

By creating a large KML file and then converting it to a KMZ, it becomes a manageable size. KMZ files load into google earth significantly faster then KML files. One of the interesting things that you can do in Google Earth is display the elevation profile of a path.

ROAV-ConCatVideoElevation

On this day you can see that I started at just under 4500 feet, drove over 6000 feet, then down to 1733 feet before ending the day near 2500 feet. When playing with the desktop app, you can drag a marker along the path and it will coordinate a marker along the elevation profile.

I’ve added this code to my ROAV-Concat program, as well as parameters that can tell the program to not output KML or MP4. this allows me to run the program and just generate the KMZ or MP4 file, though beyond during debugging I can’t think of a reason I’d not want both files generated.

I’m hoping that understanding all of this data will allow me to generate text to overlay the video with GPS data beyond what was embedded by the original dashcam.

I replaced Google Reader with InoReader

Google reader has been my primary method of keeping up with technological changes over the past few years. I’ve liked the cloud based system that I can read from my laptop, desktop, or tablet, and it will keep track of what I’e read so I don’t have to read the same thing multiple times.

In the early days of the internet, I used usenet news feeds and an nntp reader to keep up with what was going on around the world and with various programming projects. A decade after Usenet died under its own weight Google Reader made RSS a usable replacement for me.

Google reader announced they were shutting down after July 1st, and they followed through with it.

I’ve tried out Feedly, Digg, and looked at several more. I decided to go with InoReader because while it only has a cloud based interface, it is most similar to the quick method I’ve been used to for reading my news.

Feedly has a really nice iPad app that syncs with their system. Digg has an iPad app, but it requires iOS6, which I’ve delayed installing, and I’ve not seen it in use yet.

I’m certain that Google exiting the RSS reader market has increased the innovation in RSS Readers, and may create a revitalization of the technology in general.