And We Just Went Smashed

I found this set of images interesting because of how mundane it seems, and also the information printed on it.

Ingersoll View Company St. Paul, Minn.  U. S. A.
High Grade Original View Sold only by Subscription.

I created three frames in this GIF, the first is background, the second slides the left photo over the right, the third slides the right photo over the left. I aligned the photos using the tree in the center of the frame. The overlap of the photos and the text really shows how misaligned the original photos were.

The Library of Congress has several stereograph cards by this company, but I didn’t find this particular one. I don’t know how often subscription photos were sent out. or what the general quality of the subscriptions may have been.

And We Just Went Smashed

“And We Just Went Smashed–(illustrated.)

We’s mast burdlars

An interesting thing I’ve figured out while playing with these animated gifs is the importance of picture alignment. If the pictures are simply swapped, it sometimes only adds movement. In this example I aligned the picture frame in the top left portion of the picture. you can see how much difference in overlap the photos have by the edge of either picture.

To achieve reasonable alignment, I changed the opacity of the layer to 50% while I was positioning it, then after I had positioned it changed it back to 100%.

We's mast burdlars

“We’s mast burdlars, where ‘oo keeps ‘oo cookies?”

 

Blowing the Alpine Horn, Grindelwald Switzerland

I had to look this up, as I have especially fond memories of the mountains in Switzerland. Grindelwald is the valley near the Eiger mountain. I spent much more time in Zermatt and was mistakenly remembering the Gornergrat. I don’t remember ever seeing an Alpine Horn in the early 1990s.

Blowing the Alpine Horn, Grindelwald, Switzerland

Blowing the Alpine Horn, Grindelwald, Switzerland

Grindlewald, one of the most beautiful of the high Alpine valleys, is about twelve miles long and four miles broad. It owes its celebrity as a resort for travelers to two great glaciers, branches, or arms, as it were, of the immense ocean of ice which covers the Bernese Oberland. The village of Grindelwald consists of a number of widely scattered cottages with about 3,500 inhabitants. There is probably no more popular tourist headquarters in Switzerland than Grindelwald. Not only does it lodge summer guests, but it enjoys a carefully planned winter campaign, which it really deserves. As the traveler approaches the village, spread out over the quiet valley, the surrounding mountains are often heard to echo and resound with the long drawn notes of the Alpine horn, blown by some enterprising yodler who comes into view as we round a curve in the mountainous ascent, and who now with great assurance demands a fee for his voluntary entertainment.